GUILDERLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Guilderland Historical Society

Subtitle

GHS 2017 Programs

September 21st, 7:30 pm


The September 21 program will be "Baseball's Greatest Hit: Take Me Out to the Ballgame" presented by Tim Wiles.


Time Wiles has promised a lively, fun evening when he describes the history of "Baseball's Greatest Hit:Take Me Out to the Ball Game" at the Guilderland Historical Society's September 21st meeting. Using pictures and music he will tell the story of the 109 year old song familiar to almost all Americans, baseball fan or not.



Mr. Wiles, Guilderland Library Director since 2014, was formerly Director of Research at the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library in Cooperstown. He co-authored a book about the song in 2008 at the time of its centennial.


Everyone is invited to join Historical Society members 7:30 pm for this free program and for the social hour following at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. For information or directions call 518 861-8582.


"NYS Path Through History” Event


June 17, 2017 



         The Guilderland Historical Society and the Guilderland Garden Club held  an Open House at the 1802 Mynderse-Frederick House in Guilderland Center on Saturday, June 17, from 1-4 pm.  Tours of the House, decorated with flower arrangements provided by the Garden Club, were conducted by Historical Society members. Tours of the award-winning gardens maintained by the Garden Club were also available. 



     In addition, there was a display of items related to the historic 1860 Cobblestone Schoolhouse just down the road. 

     Though the Schoolhouse is not open to the public at present, visitors will be welcome to view the exterior, a masonry marvel, which is included in Cobblestone Landmarks of New York State. 

     The Historical Society will have publications for sale and offer a do-it-yourself driving tour of other local landmarks.
 
      Refreshments were served, courtesy of the Garden Club.  Members of both organizations were on hand to answer questions, and visitors were able to meet our new Town Historian, Ann Wemple-Person.



May 18th, 2017 



“The Hudson-Mohawk Region: Silicon Valley of the 19th Century” was Michael Barrett’s power-point presentation at the May 18 meeting of the Guilderland Historical Society. This program will provide a portrait of our area in a past era when its towns and cities were a national center for innovation, invention and a tremendous amount of manufacturing.


 Michael Barrett is the Executive Director the Hudson-Mohawk Industrial Gateway. This organization is dedicated to recording and preserving the industrial history of this area and educating the public. Knowledgeable guides offer tours to local sites and operate a museum located in  what had been the office of the Burden Ironworks in South Troy. Mr. Barrett has been involved with the Gateway for many years and often leads tours of Troy’s historic Oakwood Cemetery. He is a dynamic speaker and will make the subject come alive.


The public is invited to join historical society members for this free program and the social hour following. The May 18 meeting begins at 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. For additional information call 861-8582.

April 20th, 2017 


“1912: George Lunn and the Socialist Takeover of Schenectady” was the Guilderland Historical Society’s program Thursday, April 20 when Bill Buell will be telling the story of a historic political upset. A very well- known figure in his time, George Lunn not only served as Mayor of Schenectady, but also a term in Congress and a term as lieutenant-governor of New York. Lunn’s years as mayor had a big impact on Schenectady.


Bill Buell has been a Daily Gazette journalist since 1977 where he often covers stories of historical interest. With a degree in history from SUNY, he is a local historian in his spare time. He has researched Lunn’s years in Schenectady in depth and written about Lunn’s many accomplishments during his two terms in office in a book with the same title as his program.


March 16th, 2017


"A Night With Tom Thorpe" was the program for the Guilderland Historical Society's March 16 meeting. He is a talented musician who has performed throughout the Northeast and will be presenting a selection of pieces from his extensive repertoire that are some of his favorites. He is a singer, song writer and multi-instrumentalist whose wide range of performance includes folk, Irish, country and bluegrass.




February 16th, 2017 


“From the West Manor of Rensselaerwyck to Westmere: Three Hundred Years of Guilderland’s Place Names” was the Guilderland Historical Society’s February program.Using photographs from the society’s extensive collection Mary Ellen Johnson will describe the evolution of the names of our town’s communities. Some names are still in everyday use, others are obsolete, and still others are remembered only by old timers or local history buffs.

      Ms. Johnson has been reading, researching and writing about Guilderland history in the society’s newsletter “The Frederick House News” for many years. She was the co-author with Alice Begley of the Arcadia Press book Guilderland, NY. A retired teacher, she is a graduate of SUNY Albany.



2016 Programs

November 2016 



"An Evening with Blacksmith Jim Moran: Questions and Answers" was our November program. Jim Moran has been an active blacksmith since 1972 and since that time,  many blacksmiths have formed groups to share the craft and learn from one another. Jim will discuss the process of forming iron /steel into useful tools or art using the same craft that has been used for thousands of years.


Jim Moran  has been a member of Artist and Blacksmiths Association of North America (ABANA) for many years and was the President of the Northeast Blacksmiths in the past. He formed the Capital District Blacksmiths Association in 2001 and is the groups' leader and most active member. He was employed by DEC as an Environmental Engineer with a degree in Chemical Engineering. Jim is currently the resident blacksmith at the Normanskill Farm where he and the CDBA demonstrate blacksmithing to the school children of Albany. He resides in Delmar.



October 2016


       “American Stoneware: Both Utilitarian and Beautiful,” will be Robert’s Halley’s presentation for the Guilderland Historical Society’s program at their Thursday, October 20 meeting. He will be discussing the assorted fired clay containers such as the crocks, jugs and churns in common use for food storage and preservation in the years before refrigeration. Often decorated by individual potters with blue designs, today surviving stoneware pieces are often prized antiques, the best now considered folk art.


      Mr. Halley is a retired educator who turned his fascination with 18th and 19th century American antiques into an additional career when in 1970 he and his late wife began to buy and sell early pieces such as coverlets, painted tin ware, stoneware, etc. Especially interested in stoneware, Mr. Halley has a large personal collection and will be bringing some examples for display Thursday evening as he describes their use and manufacture.

September 2016
  
   Aaron Mair spoke about “The Battle of the Normanskill Through African-American Eyes,” the story of the aid received from the 1st Rhode Island Regiment supporting local Patriots who faced a crowd of Tories at the Van Patten farm here in Guilderland. Among the members of that Rhode Island regiment were many African-Americans.  Mr. Mair’s program will add to our understanding of this historic Revolutionary War event and give insight into what African-Americans were fighting for in the Revolution.

      Guilderland resident Aaron Mair is an environmental activist who began his activities 31 years ago, organizing the residents of Arbor Hill to fight a toxic incinerator causing respiratory problems in their neighborhood. Three decades later his activities led to his election as the first African-American president of the national Sierra Club in 2015. In addition he has made a study of African-American military history, being especially interested in local involvement. He has done much research into the role of the 1st Rhode Island Regiment and its members.


May  2016    

     Dr. Bruce W. Dearstyne discussed his new book The Spirit of New York: Defining Events in the Empire State?s History at the Guilderland Historical Society?s Thursday, May 19 meeting. Examining sixteen key events in New York State? history ranging from the 1777 writing of the state?s first constitution to the more contemporary topics of building the New York State Thruway and the courage of New York City?s firemen during and after 9/11, he has written a thoroughly researched book to be read by anyone with an interest in history. Two of the most interesting chapters from his book will be the focus of his presentation at the meeting.

     A longtime resident of Guilderland, Dr. Dearstyne is a  member of the Guilderland Historical Society. He holds a Ph.D. in history from Syracuse University, serving on the staff of the New York Office of State History and for many years was a program director of the New York State Archives. Specializing in New York State history, he has taught college classes locally at SUNY Albany and Russell Sage and is currently an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland College of Information Studies. 



      The Guilderland Historical Society welcomes nonmembers to join us at the May 19 meeting at 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. A social hour will follow the program. Please bring nonperishable food to be donated to Guilderland?s food pantries. For information call 861-8582.

April program blub

      "The People of Watervliet: Unexpected Stories of Life in the Albany Shaker Community."                                           will be the Guilderland Historical Society?s program at their Thursday, April 21st meeting. The program will be presented by Samantha Hall-Saladino.
     ?The accent on union and order in Shakerism did not produce mindless conformity,? Shaker historian Stephen Stein wrote in his book, The Shaker Experience in America. Because the Shakers stressed aspects of community and unity, it is sometimes easy to forget the individuals that made up these villages. The personalities, idiosyncrasies, and life experiences of converts made up the dynamics within each Shaker family and sometimes led to surprising interactions, close friendships, or even divisions within the community. Discover the fascinating stories of some of the individual Shakers who lived at the Albany community at this program presented by the Shaker Heritage Society.
     Samantha Hall-Saladino is the Education Director at the Shaker Heritage Society, where she develops, presents, and promotes educational programming about the history of Shakers and their influence on American culture for audiences ranging from school children to seniors living with Alzheimer?s. She also serves as the historian for Fulton County, where she lives with her husband and their dog and two cats.
    The April 21st meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center and is free and nonmembers are welcome. Nonperishable food items are being collected for the local food pantries. In case of inclement weather check our web site www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation. For information call 861-8582.
      "The People of Watervliet: Unexpected Stories of Life in the Albany Shaker Community."                                           will be the Guilderland Historical Society?s program at their Thursday, April 21st meeting. The program will be presented by Samantha Hall-Saladino.
     ?The accent on union and order in Shakerism did not produce mindless conformity,? Shaker historian Stephen Stein wrote in his book, The Shaker Experience in America. Because the Shakers stressed aspects of community and unity, it is sometimes easy to forget the individuals that made up these villages. The personalities, idiosyncrasies, and life experiences of converts made up the dynamics within each Shaker family and sometimes led to surprising interactions, close friendships, or even divisions within the community. Discover the fascinating stories of some of the individual Shakers who lived at the Albany community at this program presented by the Shaker Heritage Society.
     Samantha Hall-Saladino is the Education Director at the Shaker Heritage Society, where she develops, presents, and promotes educational programming about the history of Shakers and their influence on American culture for audiences ranging from school children to seniors living with Alzheimer?s. She also serves as the historian for Fulton County, where she lives with her husband and their dog and two cats.
    The April 21st meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center and is free and nonmembers are welcome. Nonperishable food items are being collected for the local food pantries. In case of inclement weather check our web site www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation. For information call 861-8582.
 April  2016
 
       "The People of Watervliet: Unexpected Stories of Life in the Albany Shaker Community." - presented by Samantha Hall-Saladino.
 
     ?The accent on union and order in Shakerism did not produce mindless conformity,? Shaker historian Stephen Stein wrote in his book, The Shaker Experience in America. Because the Shakers stressed aspects of community and unity, it is sometimes easy to forget the individuals that made up these villages. The personalities, idiosyncrasies, and life experiences of converts made up the dynamics within each Shaker family and sometimes led to surprising interactions, close friendships, or even divisions within the community. Discover the fascinating stories of some of the individual Shakers who lived at the Albany community at this program presented by the Shaker Heritage Society.
     Samantha Hall-Saladino is the Education Director at the Shaker Heritage Society, where she develops, presents, and promotes educational programming about the history of Shakers and their influence on American culture for audiences ranging from school children to seniors living with Alzheimer?s. She also serves as the historian for Fulton County, where she lives with her husband and their dog and two cats.
    The April 21st meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center and is free and nonmembers are welcome. Nonperishable food items are being collected for the local food pantries. In case of inclement weather check our web site www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation. For information call 861-8582.
        ?The accent on union and order in Shakerism did not produce mindless conformity,? Shaker historian Stephen Stein wrote in his book, The Shaker Experience in America. Because the Shakers stressed aspects of community and unity, it is sometimes easy to forget the individuals that made up these villages. The personalities, idiosyncrasies, and life experiences of converts made up the dynamics within each Shaker family and sometimes led to surprising interactions, close friendships, or even divisions within the community. Discover the fascinating stories of some of the individual Shakers who lived at the Albany community at this program presented by the Shaker Heritage Society.
  
      Samantha Hall-Saladino is the Education Director at the Shaker Heritage Society, where she develops, presents, and promotes educational programming about the history of Shakers and their influence on American culture for audiences ranging from school children to seniors living with Alzheimer?s. She also serves as the historian for Fulton County.
    The April 21st meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center and is free and nonmembers are welcome. Nonperishable food items are being collected for the local food pantries. In case of inclement weather check our web site www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation. For information call 861-8582.


?An Evening With Everett Rau? will be the Guilderland Historical Society?s program at their Thursday, March 17 meeting. Everett will be having an informal conversation with the audience sharing his memories of living 96 years on his family?s ancestral farm. Not only will he touch on the old days and ways on the farm, but also on other incidents in his long and interesting life in a free ranging interaction with members of the audience. There will also be copies of his life story Stand Tall Against The Odds as told to Laura Shore available for purchase and autographing.
      A lifelong Guilderland resident, Everett is knowledgeable about early 20th century agricultural methods, old barns particularly Dutch barns and antique farm equipment. He is passionate about preserving agricultural heritage and will be sharing his thoughts and knowledge of post 1929 farming methods.
      Over the years his involvement with many organizations has contributed much to our community. For several decades he has been a member of Guilderland Historical Society and is one of our past presidents.
      The March 17 meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center and is free and nonmembers are welcome. Nonperishable food items are being collected for the local food pantries. In case of inclement weather check our web site www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation. For information call 861-8582.
March  2016

  ?An Evening With Everett Rau? will be the Guilderland Historical Society?s program at their Thursday, March 17 meeting. Everett will be having an informal conversation with the audience sharing his memories of living 96 years on his family?s ancestral farm. Not only will he touch on the old days and ways on the farm, but also on other incidents in his long and interesting life in a free ranging interaction with members of the audience. There will also be copies of his life story Stand Tall Against The Odds as told to Laura Shore available for purchase and autographing.

      A lifelong Guilderland resident, Everett is knowledgeable about early 20th century agricultural methods, old barns particularly Dutch barns and antique farm equipment. He is passionate about preserving agricultural heritage and will be sharing his thoughts and knowledge of post 1929 farming methods.

      Over the years his involvement with many organizations has contributed much to our community. For several decades he has been a member of Guilderland Historical Society and is one of our past presidents.

    

      Bill Donato will be speaking at the February 18 meeting of the Guilderland Historical Society describing his activities “Recording Guilderland’s Family Cemeteries.” His retirement project of tracing the town’s old family cemeteries, photographing the old grave stones and then posting the photographs on genealogical websites has added documentation to sources of information about Guilderland’s founding families. He will be describing how he located their whereabouts, his interactions with their current owners and what he has found.
      After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.
      Nonmembers are welcome to attend this free program of the Guilderland Historical Society on Thursday February 18. Meeting time is 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. In case of inclement weather check our website www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation or call 861-8582 for information.
      Bill Donato will be speaking at the February 18 meeting of the Guilderland Historical Society describing his activities “Recording Guilderland’s Family Cemeteries.” His retirement project of tracing the town’s old family cemeteries, photographing the old grave stones and then posting the photographs on genealogical websites has added documentation to sources of information about Guilderland’s founding families. He will be describing how he located their whereabouts, his interactions with their current owners and what he has found.
      After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.
      Nonmembers are welcome to attend this free program of the Guilderland Historical Society on Thursday February 18. Meeting time is 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. In case of inclement weather check our website www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation or call 861-8582 for information.
 February 2016

   Bill Donato spoke to the Guilderland Historical Society describing his activities “Recording Guilderland’s Family Cemeteries.” His retirement project of tracing the town’s old family cemeteries, photographing the old grave stones and then posting the photographs on genealogical websites has added documentation to sources of information about Guilderland’s founding families. He will be describing how he located their whereabouts, his interactions with their current owners and what he has found.

     After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten.

 


      Nonmembers are welcome to attend this free program of the Guilderland Historical Society on Thursday February 18. Meeting time is 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. In case of inclement weather check our website www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation or call 861-8582 for information.



Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.
 Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.



      After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.


Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.

      After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.
      Nonmembers are welcome to attend this free program of the Guilderland Historical Society on Thursday February 18. Meeting time is 7:30 pm at the Mynderse-Frederick House, 451 Route 146, Guilderland Center. In case of inclement weather check our website www.guilderlandhistoricalsociety.org after 3 pm for news of possible cancellation or call 861-8582 for information.

      After retiring from heavy construction, Mr. Donato has found his quest of documenting these historic burial plots a worthwhile pursuit. Getting out into the open air and preserving historical information from these old cemeteries that could easily be lost through deterioration, vandalism or development greatly appealed to him. In rural areas such as Guilderland during the 18th and early 19th centuries, each family would set aside a small area on their farm as a family cemetery. Once large cemeteries such as Fairview or Prospect Hill opened, these small burial grounds gradually were abandoned as the original families sold the farms. Over time the plots often became overgrown and forgotten. Mr. Donato’s quest to recover their locations and information to be found there should make a program that will appeal to anyone interested in town history, old cemeteries or genealogy.